Sunday, January 1, 2017

The World Celebrates 2017 Under Very High Security




The New Year celebrations, launched by a giant fireworks display in Sydney, were held in high security in many countries of the world after a year of bloodshed by a series of attacks.


But the crowds expected to attend Saturday evening in the streets of Asia, the Near East, Africa, Europe and then America to switch to a year full of political and geopolitical uncertainties.

"We have not finished with the scourge of terrorism," French President François Hollande said in his televised vows. "But be certain of one thing, that of this fight against barbarism democracy will come out victorious," he added.

The New Year celebrations, launched by a giant fireworks display in Sydney, were held in high security in many countries of the world after a year of bloodshed by a series of attacks.

But the crowds expected to attend Saturday evening in the streets of Asia, the Near East, Africa, Europe and then America to switch to a year full of political and geopolitical uncertainties.
"We have not finished with the scourge of terrorism," French President François Hollande said in his televised vows. "But be certain of one thing, that of this fight against barbarism democracy will come out victorious," he added.

In Nice (86 dead) and Berlin (12 dead) rallies had been targeted by rams trucks, in a scenario particularly feared for this New Year's Eve.

Baghdad, Ouagadougou, Istanbul, Orlando, Brussels ... The list is long of the cities hit by the blind attacks in 2016.
Due to the jet lag, Sydney was the first metropolis to launch the countdown in a sweet summer: at midnight (1300 GMT), more than 1.5 million spectators discovered a pyrotechnic fairytale above the emblematic Bay and its opera.

In Tokyo, balloons were dropped by thousands while in Seoul, half a million Koreans chose to demonstrate, candles in hand, to demand the immediate departure of the dismissed president Park Geun-Hye.

The new king of Thailand Maha Vajiralongkorn, in televised vows, called his subjects to unity.

Due to the jet lag, Sydney was the first metropolis to launch the countdown in a sweet summer: at midnight (1300 GMT), more than 1.5 million spectators discovered a pyrotechnic fairytale above the emblematic Bay and its opera.

In Tokyo, balloons were dropped by thousands while in Seoul, half a million Koreans chose to demonstrate, candles in hand, to demand the immediate departure of the dismissed president Park Geun-Hye.
The new king of Thailand Maha Vajiralongkorn, in televised vows, called his subjects to unity.

At the Vespers, Pope Francis pleaded in favor of the young: "If we want to aim for a future worthy of them, we can only achieve it by betting on a true inclusion", notably by the " job".

- Paris again a party -

On every continent, safety is at the heart of concerns.

Jakarta said he had foiled a planned jihadist attack at Christmas. Israel warned Friday of "immediate" risks of attacks likely to target Israeli tourists in India.
In Turkey, after multiple attacks and a failed coup last summer, the controls were muscled and police will be disguised as Santa Claus to detect the slightest anomaly in the crowds.

In New York, "blocking" vehicles - including cleaning trucks - were to be placed in "strategic locations", particularly around Times Square, where more than a million people are expected.




In Berlin, concrete blocks, and armored vehicles were placed on the outskirts of the Brandenburg Gate. The public, who was beginning to flock, was searched.

In Turkey, after multiple attacks and a failed coup last summer, the controls were muscled and police will be disguised as Santa Claus to detect the slightest anomaly in the crowds.

In New York, "blocking" vehicles - including cleaning trucks - were to be placed in "strategic locations", particularly around Times Square, where more than a million people are expected.
In Berlin, concrete blocks, and armored vehicles were placed on the outskirts of the Brandenburg Gate. The public, who was beginning to flock, was searched.

Angela Merkel called the Germans to "compassion" and "cohesion" in front of "hateful assassins".

In Paris, after a New Year 2016 mourned by the attacks of November 13, 2015, half a million people were expected.
The safety is maximal: nearly 100,000 police and military are mobilized in France and new protective devices are installed, as here, too, concrete blocks.

In Moscow, Red Square was closed to the general public, its limited access to 6,000 guests. The "difficulties" of 2016 "allowed us to get together," said President Vladimir Putin in his vows.

In Nicosia, the capital of the Mediterranean island of Cyprus divided since 1974, several dozens of people had to take advantage of the time difference between the northern and southern parts to celebrate twice the passage to 2017. "A kind of peaceful protest", explained in A wink Michalis Tsiknakis, one of the organizers of the event.
In Tunisia, the only country that has survived the Arab Spring six years ago, President Béji Caïd Essebsi has striven to deliver "optimistic" wishes.

"2017 will be the year of takeoff," he assured, while Tunisia remains stuck in economic gloom.

- One more second -

In Rio, more than two million people are expected on Copacabana beach. But, crisis obliges, the fireworks will be slightly shortened.

America is the last continent to tumble into a new year that is full of unknowns, starting with the arrival at the White House of the populist Donald Trump, who wished on Twitter a good year "to all even To (many) enemies ".

There is also uncertainty about the outcome of a conflict in Syria whose shock wave has been spreading for nearly six years beyond the Near East and where a partial ceasefire has just come into force.

Baghdad was hit by a double suicide bombing, which killed nearly 30 people.

Party revelers of the entire planet will enjoy an extra second to enjoy this unique night.

Thus, the minute between 23H59 and 00H00 GMT will last one second more, a "second interlayer" that allows connecting the astronomical + irregular time related to the rotation of the Earth, with the legal time scale.

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